THE HIDDEN YOU AND YOUR LEADERSHIP EVOLUTION A Systematic Approach to Leadership Transcendence
Does your company have contrast to create expansion? November 18th, 2018 - Contrast Creates Expansion In order to expand, whether it be for a company or as an individual, regardless of the subject or intent, contrast is required. Without contrast there would be nothing to compare. Leading to no alternatives and no way to determine success or failure. The number one killer of contrast in support of creating expansion is self-preservation. Self-preservation, as an individual contributor or as part of a collective group, gone unchecked is the secret ingredient to getting left behind and ultimate failure. Without self-preservation awareness, the question remains, can the failure experienced be mitigated or successfully reversed without destroying the intended goal or desired outcome? Mike Tyson once said, “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face!”. Whether or not one is able to successfully get up off the canvas and move forward is in large part a reflection of whether or not the entity getting up fully understands the full context of “The Hidden You” and its direct relationship with self-preservation and the need for effective communication through common nomenclature. In my book, “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution”, it represents a compilation of leadership concepts, thoughts, and ideas gained over time as part of my experience in managing and successfully contributing to the growth of several Information Technology companies. Along this journey, I have come to recognize we are all born with the ability to lead. What determines this ability, and the opportunity to successfully step into a leadership role, is a set of complexities and subjects spanning both the physiological and psychological leadership realm. The goal of the “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” is to introduce leaders (e.g. influencer) of today and leaders of tomorrow to a foundation of leadership concepts based on this reality. Throughout my leadership evolution, I have read books and trade magazines, and attended leadership seminars with the sole purpose of becoming a better leader. What I discovered was most of the material presented was predominantly inspirational and built for a utopian world. I began to recognize something was missing, and there was a enormous gap between how leaders were being inspired to interact versus how they were actually interacting in the real world. What was being presented and encouraged contradicted what actually happens at all levels of leadership within society. My book “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” is about discovering the hidden you to influence your leadership evolution. Before anyone can successfully influence and lead others, before they can lead or contribute to the contrast essential to creating expansion, they must first discover both the physiological and the psychological attributes that define them. As humans, in support of overall survival, group acceptance, and innate self-preservation, we inherently spend more time running around trying to understand what others think rather than first understanding ourselves. Once our hidden you is discovered, the ability to be a star follower, while also applying a systematic approach to influence and traverse the complexities of human behavior can be realized. Our ability to successfully co-create through effective communication facilitates the opportunity for the type of contrast that leads to exponential expansion. Companies like Amazon are deeply committed to this fundamental understanding in support of growing and evolving their business. Jeff Bezos, the founder, chairman, and CEO of Amazon founded Amazon in 1994. The company was started as an on-line bookstore, and since has expanded into various products and services to include video and audio streaming. Of greater significance, Amazon is now the world’s largest provider of cloud infrastructure services via its Amazon Web Services. Amazon may not use the nomenclature of “Contrast Creates Expansion” to accomplish such bold goals and objectives, however, they are very much aligned to the critical importance of creating contrast in support of achieving company expansion. Amazon has built a culture facilitating creative thinking and encourages employees to experiment without fear of failure. This requires a systematic approach and internal culture from the top down designed to “brain hack” our innate survival instinct into being comfortable with taking bold steps that fall outside the subconscious desire to be liked through group conformation and acceptance, otherwise known as “group think”. Group think representing an individual who is encouraged and even expected to step outside what is perceived to be the social norm in support of creating the contrast necessary to expand in ways otherwise not experienced in most companies and society as a whole ﷯Looking at the picture of the Amazon drone, we are forced to recognize someone at Amazon came up with this creative idea of delivering products via a drone. Which in return required the company culture or group think dynamics inside of Amazon to encourage and accept such a bold idea, Amazon facilitated the opportunity to make it a reality and are piloting the concept today. Corporate America is full of companies who once dominated their landscape and who are no longer in existence or are a much smaller version of their once dominant selves due to an inability to foster the contrast required to successfully expand. Companies like Kodak and Blockbuster were once Wall Street darlings who are no longer dominating their respective industries. The Eastman Kodak Company (Kodak) produced imaging products through their photography business and once held a dominant position in photographic film. Kodak at its peak in 1997 had a stock-market value of nearly $30 billion. By the early 2000’s, Kodak’s dominance in photographic film began to erode. Kodak lacked the contrast and culture inside the company to successfully move and adapt to a market quickly transitioning to digital photography. As a result, Kodak was forced to sell off various patents and lines of business, leading to Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the year 2012. Currently valued at $162M, Kodak has not been able to regain the market dominance it once held. Blockbuster once dominated the entertainment home movie and video game rental market throughout North America and reached international recognition in the 90’s. At its peak in 2004 Blockbuster’s market cap rose to $5 billion and employed over 84,000 employees worldwide. Following its peak, in just 6 short years, the company filed bankruptcy. Blockbuster’s inability to move and adapt and lack of contrast internal to the organizational culture allowed competitors like Netflix and Redbox to enter and substantially erode Blockbuster’s dominance in the market. It would be remiss to not point out Amazon’s penetration and success in growing their video and audio streaming entertainment business, and the impact they are having on the likes of Netflix and Redbox. Does Netflix and Redbox have the counter culture to our innate survival instincts to create the contrast necessary for future expansion? Only time will tell. Those closest to these two companies certainly know the answer. Without an understanding of the hidden you, the ability to create contrast in support of successful expansion is significantly impacted by the innate physiological and psychological attributes for survival which leads to the formation of internal echo chambers, company silos and turf wars. These subconscious behaviors disrupt boardrooms, limit company creativity, and ultimately significantly reduces the opportunity for expansion; leading to slow growth, lack of KPI measurements, lack of overall accountability, lagging time to market, and internal tribal formations that seek to destroy internal tribes, rather than the tribe of their competitors. So why do some companies succeed in creating contrast where others fail? The answer to the question is a complex matrix in association with the hidden you and our innate survival instincts as humans. Self-preservation in the workplace is not something new, it has always been omni-present. It has been present from the time we roamed the Savannah's as part of a tribe to increase our survival by working together to avoid being eaten by a large predator. The same self-preservation attributes continue to this day in companies and organizations all over the world. Like many taboos associated with social behaviors in the workplace, it’s just not something discussed or well understood. As is common in all companies, culture tribal social echo chambers develop and evolve in direct association with the innate survival instincts subconsciously and sometimes consciously on display regardless of where you work. This innate behavior is not isolated to any one company, it has been in existence since before the invention of the wheel and will continue to exist for as long as we humans roam the earth. How companies and individuals address self-preservation in support of the contrast necessary to create expansion is often the difference between success and failure. It is important to recognize these innate instinctive behaviors are not a bad thing. They have kept humans on the top of the food chain. It is through these conscious and subconscious instinctive behaviors that human civilization has been able to evolve. The opportunity is to recognize that these survival instincts exist, and to address them through common nomenclature so not to invoke them in a way that disrupts individual and company success. Thus, providing the frame work and systematic approach that leads to creating the contrast required for successful expansion. If you would like to learn more about “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution”, visit the home page of this website and purchase your book today. “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” can also be purchased on Amazon or Apple. John Slone, author of The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution, has partnered with Ridgeline Coaching. Ridgeline Coaching is dedicated to helping leaders grow and connect more powerfully with their leadership strengths and their teams. We are pleased to be offering The Leadership Evolution workshop. This is an interactive session where participants will dive deeper into the materials presented in the book and work on ways to incorporate a systematic approach to their own leadership growth and development. For more on the workshop or to “book a workshop for your organization, please contact us at www.RidgelineCoaching.com.

 

A Systematic Approach to Leadership Transcendence
Does your company have contrast to create expansion? November 18th, 2018 - Contrast Creates Expansion In order to expand, whether it be for a company or as an individual, regardless of the subject or intent, contrast is required. Without contrast there would be nothing to compare. Leading to no alternatives and no way to determine success or failure. The number one killer of contrast in support of creating expansion is self-preservation. Self-preservation, as an individual contributor or as part of a collective group, gone unchecked is the secret ingredient to getting left behind and ultimate failure. Without self-preservation awareness, the question remains, can the failure experienced be mitigated or successfully reversed without destroying the intended goal or desired outcome? Mike Tyson once said, “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face!”. Whether or not one is able to successfully get up off the canvas and move forward is in large part a reflection of whether or not the entity getting up fully understands the full context of “The Hidden You” and its direct relationship with self-preservation and the need for effective communication through common nomenclature. In my book, “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution”, it represents a compilation of leadership concepts, thoughts, and ideas gained over time as part of my experience in managing and successfully contributing to the growth of several Information Technology companies. Along this journey, I have come to recognize we are all born with the ability to lead. What determines this ability, and the opportunity to successfully step into a leadership role, is a set of complexities and subjects spanning both the physiological and psychological leadership realm. The goal of the “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” is to introduce leaders (e.g. influencer) of today and leaders of tomorrow to a foundation of leadership concepts based on this reality. Throughout my leadership evolution, I have read books and trade magazines, and attended leadership seminars with the sole purpose of becoming a better leader. What I discovered was most of the material presented was predominantly inspirational and built for a utopian world. I began to recognize something was missing, and there was a enormous gap between how leaders were being inspired to interact versus how they were actually interacting in the real world. What was being presented and encouraged contradicted what actually happens at all levels of leadership within society. My book “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” is about discovering the hidden you to influence your leadership evolution. Before anyone can successfully influence and lead others, before they can lead or contribute to the contrast essential to creating expansion, they must first discover both the physiological and the psychological attributes that define them. As humans, in support of overall survival, group acceptance, and innate self-preservation, we inherently spend more time running around trying to understand what others think rather than first understanding ourselves. Once our hidden you is discovered, the ability to be a star follower, while also applying a systematic approach to influence and traverse the complexities of human behavior can be realized. Our ability to successfully co-create through effective communication facilitates the opportunity for the type of contrast that leads to exponential expansion. Companies like Amazon are deeply committed to this fundamental understanding in support of growing and evolving their business. Jeff Bezos, the founder, chairman, and CEO of Amazon founded Amazon in 1994. The company was started as an on-line bookstore, and since has expanded into various products and services to include video and audio streaming. Of greater significance, Amazon is now the world’s largest provider of cloud infrastructure services via its Amazon Web Services. Amazon may not use the nomenclature of “Contrast Creates Expansion” to accomplish such bold goals and objectives, however, they are very much aligned to the critical importance of creating contrast in support of achieving company expansion. Amazon has built a culture facilitating creative thinking and encourages employees to experiment without fear of failure. This requires a systematic approach and internal culture from the top down designed to “brain hack” our innate survival instinct into being comfortable with taking bold steps that fall outside the subconscious desire to be liked through group conformation and acceptance, otherwise known as “group think”. Group think representing an individual who is encouraged and even expected to step outside what is perceived to be the social norm in support of creating the contrast necessary to expand in ways otherwise not experienced in most companies and society as a whole ﷯Looking at the picture of the Amazon drone, we are forced to recognize someone at Amazon came up with this creative idea of delivering products via a drone. Which in return required the company culture or group think dynamics inside of Amazon to encourage and accept such a bold idea, Amazon facilitated the opportunity to make it a reality and are piloting the concept today. Corporate America is full of companies who once dominated their landscape and who are no longer in existence or are a much smaller version of their once dominant selves due to an inability to foster the contrast required to successfully expand. Companies like Kodak and Blockbuster were once Wall Street darlings who are no longer dominating their respective industries. The Eastman Kodak Company (Kodak) produced imaging products through their photography business and once held a dominant position in photographic film. Kodak at its peak in 1997 had a stock-market value of nearly $30 billion. By the early 2000’s, Kodak’s dominance in photographic film began to erode. Kodak lacked the contrast and culture inside the company to successfully move and adapt to a market quickly transitioning to digital photography. As a result, Kodak was forced to sell off various patents and lines of business, leading to Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the year 2012. Currently valued at $162M, Kodak has not been able to regain the market dominance it once held. Blockbuster once dominated the entertainment home movie and video game rental market throughout North America and reached international recognition in the 90’s. At its peak in 2004 Blockbuster’s market cap rose to $5 billion and employed over 84,000 employees worldwide. Following its peak, in just 6 short years, the company filed bankruptcy. Blockbuster’s inability to move and adapt and lack of contrast internal to the organizational culture allowed competitors like Netflix and Redbox to enter and substantially erode Blockbuster’s dominance in the market. It would be remiss to not point out Amazon’s penetration and success in growing their video and audio streaming entertainment business, and the impact they are having on the likes of Netflix and Redbox. Does Netflix and Redbox have the counter culture to our innate survival instincts to create the contrast necessary for future expansion? Only time will tell. Those closest to these two companies certainly know the answer. Without an understanding of the hidden you, the ability to create contrast in support of successful expansion is significantly impacted by the innate physiological and psychological attributes for survival which leads to the formation of internal echo chambers, company silos and turf wars. These subconscious behaviors disrupt boardrooms, limit company creativity, and ultimately significantly reduces the opportunity for expansion; leading to slow growth, lack of KPI measurements, lack of overall accountability, lagging time to market, and internal tribal formations that seek to destroy internal tribes, rather than the tribe of their competitors. So why do some companies succeed in creating contrast where others fail? The answer to the question is a complex matrix in association with the hidden you and our innate survival instincts as humans. Self-preservation in the workplace is not something new, it has always been omni-present. It has been present from the time we roamed the Savannah's as part of a tribe to increase our survival by working together to avoid being eaten by a large predator. The same self-preservation attributes continue to this day in companies and organizations all over the world. Like many taboos associated with social behaviors in the workplace, it’s just not something discussed or well understood. As is common in all companies, culture tribal social echo chambers develop and evolve in direct association with the innate survival instincts subconsciously and sometimes consciously on display regardless of where you work. This innate behavior is not isolated to any one company, it has been in existence since before the invention of the wheel and will continue to exist for as long as we humans roam the earth. How companies and individuals address self-preservation in support of the contrast necessary to create expansion is often the difference between success and failure. It is important to recognize these innate instinctive behaviors are not a bad thing. They have kept humans on the top of the food chain. It is through these conscious and subconscious instinctive behaviors that human civilization has been able to evolve. The opportunity is to recognize that these survival instincts exist, and to address them through common nomenclature so not to invoke them in a way that disrupts individual and company success. Thus, providing the frame work and systematic approach that leads to creating the contrast required for successful expansion. If you would like to learn more about “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution”, visit the home page of this website and purchase your book today. “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” can also be purchased on Amazon or Apple. John Slone, author of The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution, has partnered with Ridgeline Coaching. Ridgeline Coaching is dedicated to helping leaders grow and connect more powerfully with their leadership strengths and their teams. We are pleased to be offering The Leadership Evolution workshop. This is an interactive session where participants will dive deeper into the materials presented in the book and work on ways to incorporate a systematic approach to their own leadership growth and development. For more on the workshop or to “book a workshop for your organization, please contact us at www.RidgelineCoaching.com.
A Systematic Approach to Leadership Transcendence
Does your company have contrast to create expansion? November 18th, 2018 - Contrast Creates Expansion In order to expand, whether it be for a company or as an individual, regardless of the subject or intent, contrast is required. Without contrast there would be nothing to compare. Leading to no alternatives and no way to determine success or failure. The number one killer of contrast in support of creating expansion is self-preservation. Self-preservation, as an individual contributor or as part of a collective group, gone unchecked is the secret ingredient to getting left behind and ultimate failure. Without self-preservation awareness, the question remains, can the failure experienced be mitigated or successfully reversed without destroying the intended goal or desired outcome? Mike Tyson once said, “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face!”. Whether or not one is able to successfully get up off the canvas and move forward is in large part a reflection of whether or not the entity getting up fully understands the full context of “The Hidden You” and its direct relationship with self-preservation and the need for effective communication through common nomenclature. In my book, “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution”, it represents a compilation of leadership concepts, thoughts, and ideas gained over time as part of my experience in managing and successfully contributing to the growth of several Information Technology companies. Along this journey, I have come to recognize we are all born with the ability to lead. What determines this ability, and the opportunity to successfully step into a leadership role, is a set of complexities and subjects spanning both the physiological and psychological leadership realm. The goal of the “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” is to introduce leaders (e.g. influencer) of today and leaders of tomorrow to a foundation of leadership concepts based on this reality. Throughout my leadership evolution, I have read books and trade magazines, and attended leadership seminars with the sole purpose of becoming a better leader. What I discovered was most of the material presented was predominantly inspirational and built for a utopian world. I began to recognize something was missing, and there was a enormous gap between how leaders were being inspired to interact versus how they were actually interacting in the real world. What was being presented and encouraged contradicted what actually happens at all levels of leadership within society. My book “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” is about discovering the hidden you to influence your leadership evolution. Before anyone can successfully influence and lead others, before they can lead or contribute to the contrast essential to creating expansion, they must first discover both the physiological and the psychological attributes that define them. As humans, in support of overall survival, group acceptance, and innate self-preservation, we inherently spend more time running around trying to understand what others think rather than first understanding ourselves. Once our hidden you is discovered, the ability to be a star follower, while also applying a systematic approach to influence and traverse the complexities of human behavior can be realized. Our ability to successfully co-create through effective communication facilitates the opportunity for the type of contrast that leads to exponential expansion. Companies like Amazon are deeply committed to this fundamental understanding in support of growing and evolving their business. Jeff Bezos, the founder, chairman, and CEO of Amazon founded Amazon in 1994. The company was started as an on-line bookstore, and since has expanded into various products and services to include video and audio streaming. Of greater significance, Amazon is now the world’s largest provider of cloud infrastructure services via its Amazon Web Services. Amazon may not use the nomenclature of “Contrast Creates Expansion” to accomplish such bold goals and objectives, however, they are very much aligned to the critical importance of creating contrast in support of achieving company expansion. Amazon has built a culture facilitating creative thinking and encourages employees to experiment without fear of failure. This requires a systematic approach and internal culture from the top down designed to “brain hack” our innate survival instinct into being comfortable with taking bold steps that fall outside the subconscious desire to be liked through group conformation and acceptance, otherwise known as “group think”. Group think representing an individual who is encouraged and even expected to step outside what is perceived to be the social norm in support of creating the contrast necessary to expand in ways otherwise not experienced in most companies and society as a whole ﷯Looking at the picture of the Amazon drone, we are forced to recognize someone at Amazon came up with this creative idea of delivering products via a drone. Which in return required the company culture or group think dynamics inside of Amazon to encourage and accept such a bold idea, Amazon facilitated the opportunity to make it a reality and are piloting the concept today. Corporate America is full of companies who once dominated their landscape and who are no longer in existence or are a much smaller version of their once dominant selves due to an inability to foster the contrast required to successfully expand. Companies like Kodak and Blockbuster were once Wall Street darlings who are no longer dominating their respective industries. The Eastman Kodak Company (Kodak) produced imaging products through their photography business and once held a dominant position in photographic film. Kodak at its peak in 1997 had a stock-market value of nearly $30 billion. By the early 2000’s, Kodak’s dominance in photographic film began to erode. Kodak lacked the contrast and culture inside the company to successfully move and adapt to a market quickly transitioning to digital photography. As a result, Kodak was forced to sell off various patents and lines of business, leading to Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the year 2012. Currently valued at $162M, Kodak has not been able to regain the market dominance it once held. Blockbuster once dominated the entertainment home movie and video game rental market throughout North America and reached international recognition in the 90’s. At its peak in 2004 Blockbuster’s market cap rose to $5 billion and employed over 84,000 employees worldwide. Following its peak, in just 6 short years, the company filed bankruptcy. Blockbuster’s inability to move and adapt and lack of contrast internal to the organizational culture allowed competitors like Netflix and Redbox to enter and substantially erode Blockbuster’s dominance in the market. It would be remiss to not point out Amazon’s penetration and success in growing their video and audio streaming entertainment business, and the impact they are having on the likes of Netflix and Redbox. Does Netflix and Redbox have the counter culture to our innate survival instincts to create the contrast necessary for future expansion? Only time will tell. Those closest to these two companies certainly know the answer. Without an understanding of the hidden you, the ability to create contrast in support of successful expansion is significantly impacted by the innate physiological and psychological attributes for survival which leads to the formation of internal echo chambers, company silos and turf wars. These subconscious behaviors disrupt boardrooms, limit company creativity, and ultimately significantly reduces the opportunity for expansion; leading to slow growth, lack of KPI measurements, lack of overall accountability, lagging time to market, and internal tribal formations that seek to destroy internal tribes, rather than the tribe of their competitors. So why do some companies succeed in creating contrast where others fail? The answer to the question is a complex matrix in association with the hidden you and our innate survival instincts as humans. Self-preservation in the workplace is not something new, it has always been omni-present. It has been present from the time we roamed the Savannah's as part of a tribe to increase our survival by working together to avoid being eaten by a large predator. The same self-preservation attributes continue to this day in companies and organizations all over the world. Like many taboos associated with social behaviors in the workplace, it’s just not something discussed or well understood. As is common in all companies, culture tribal social echo chambers develop and evolve in direct association with the innate survival instincts subconsciously and sometimes consciously on display regardless of where you work. This innate behavior is not isolated to any one company, it has been in existence since before the invention of the wheel and will continue to exist for as long as we humans roam the earth. How companies and individuals address self-preservation in support of the contrast necessary to create expansion is often the difference between success and failure. It is important to recognize these innate instinctive behaviors are not a bad thing. They have kept humans on the top of the food chain. It is through these conscious and subconscious instinctive behaviors that human civilization has been able to evolve. The opportunity is to recognize that these survival instincts exist, and to address them through common nomenclature so not to invoke them in a way that disrupts individual and company success. Thus, providing the frame work and systematic approach that leads to creating the contrast required for successful expansion. If you would like to learn more about “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution”, visit the home page of this website and purchase your book today. “The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution” can also be purchased on Amazon or Apple. John Slone, author of The Hidden You and Your Leadership Evolution, has partnered with Ridgeline Coaching. Ridgeline Coaching is dedicated to helping leaders grow and connect more powerfully with their leadership strengths and their teams. We are pleased to be offering The Leadership Evolution workshop. This is an interactive session where participants will dive deeper into the materials presented in the book and work on ways to incorporate a systematic approach to their own leadership growth and development. For more on the workshop or to “book a workshop for your organization, please contact us at www.RidgelineCoaching.com.